What It Means to be a National School of Character

One of the major highlights we all shared here at Eagle Rock late last year was the honor of being designated as a National School of Character.

National School of Character

Dan Condon (far right) representing Eagle Rock at the 2012 National Schools of Character ceremony at the National Forum on Character Education.

It’s quite an accomplishment, but what exactly does it mean to be a school of character? Those learning institutions that are designated as National Schools of Character (NSOC) have all demonstrated through a rigorous evaluation process that character development has had a positive impact on academics, student behavior, and school climate.

And these so-honored institutions aren’t expected to sit back and glory in their uniqueness as pillars of character. Instead, schools like ours here at Eagle Rock are fully expected to serve as models for other academic learning centers, helping them to achieve the same results.

Eagle Rock was one of two dozen schools and a school district that were recognized in late 2012, and we have earned the distinction of serving as a National School of Character for the next five years. Before we advanced to the national level for review, Eagle Rock was named a State School of Character — along with schools and districts from 30 participating states.

The Character Education Partnership (CEP), which is the national advocate and leader for the character education movement, honored the 2012 winners last November in ceremonies in Washington, D.C. The partnership is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, nonsectarian coalition of organizations and individuals committed to fostering effective character education in the nation’s schools.

At that three-day event, Eagle Rock School & Professional Development Center received an NSOC award, banner and a small grant to help with outreach efforts (see image above, featuring our own associate director of professional development, Dan Condon).

For more information about CEP, the NSOC program, the 11 Principles of Effective Character Education, or the national forum, please visitthe Character Education Partnership website.

Finally, be sure to check Dan Condon’s interview after last year’s award ceremony:

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